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lactococcus garvieae

The first-time introduction of a bacteria into California caused a culling of many fish at hatcheries.   Member, Tom Deetz, let us know about this and below is an article from CalTrout about it.   If others find new information about this, please share on Google Groups or submit to the newsletter.  –  Scott Kitayama


CDFW Euthanizes 3.2 Million Trout to Halt Bacteria Outbreak 
July 22, 2020 (article from CalTrout)

On July 20, 2020, three California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) hatcheries in Southern California and the eastern Sierra euthanized 3.2 million hatchery trout to stop the outbreak of a bacterial infection. Fish at the hatcheries have been infected with Lactococcus garvieae, which is similar to streptococcus, wildlife officials said.

The disease was previously unknown in California, and CDFW staff have been trying multiple treatments and strategies to try to resolve the outbreak over the last three months. Efforts have been unsuccessful. Consequently and as a last resort, CDFW pathologists have recommended that the fish be euthanized and the facilities disinfected before repopulating the hatcheries with L. garvieae-free fish.

The trout, which are used to stock waterways for recreational fishing, are at Mojave River Hatchery, Black Rock Hatchery and Fish Springs Hatchery.

Where have scheduled fish plants been canceled, due to this outbreak?

The counties affected include:

– Los Angeles
– San Bernardino
– Riverside
– San Diego
– Orange
– Ventura
– Santa Barbara Inyo
– Mono

Can CDFW make up for the canceled plants with fish from non-infected hatcheries?

Currently, three of CDFW’s largest trout production hatcheries in the state are shut down, and two others are coming back online after significant infrastructure problems and not yet at full production. In addition, a catchable size fish takes around two years to get to size. There is no way for the remaining trout hatcheries to make up that level of fish production. CDFW is evaluating the possibility of re-allocating fish destined to be stocked in northern California waters to a small group of high use, easily accessible Eastern Sierra and Southern California waters, but there are still significant logistical details to be worked out including safety of staff and travel under current COVID-19 restrictions.

Can humans get sick from this bacteria? Should people take extra precaution if eating fish they catch?

There is limited evidence L. garvieae bacteria has been passed to humans, but fish-to-human transmission is extremely rare. As always, anglers should follow USDA recommendations on cooking fish to an internal temperature of 145 degrees F.

More information can be found on the CDFW FAQ list. “FAQ for Lactococcus garvieae outbreak in Southern California fish hatcheries“

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Volunteer for Salinas River Cleanup, Sunday November 22nd.

by Scott Kitayama, SCFF Member

Join the Salinas Valley Fly Fishers for the annual clean up of the Salinas River fishing access. The event will be on Sunday November 22nd starting at 9:00 am.  Jay Jefferson is the Salinas Valley Fly Fishers representative for this event.  Wear clothing for the weather of that day and if you can, bring gloves and a three prong hoe, as it’s the best tool.

Directions:

  • Go South on Highway 1 towards Monterey
  • Follow CA-1 S to Molera Rd. Take exit 414 from CA-1 S and take Nashua Rd over the highway
  • Take the first right on Monte Road 1.6 miles to your destination.   This is a dirt parking lot on the left side of the road before the twin bridges.
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Veep’s Line – Voting for John Steele Award

by Kevin Murdock, Vice President SCFF

With all the hoopla going on surrounding early voting this fall, it would be advisable for each of us to create a voting plan. No, not for the presidential election… I’m referring to our own John Steel award for 2021.
Who will be honored as this years recipient? Who has helped you on your fly fishing journey this year? Who shared a favorite fishing spot or favorite fly with you? Who showed you how to make a tuck cast or tie a new fishing knot? Who lent you a piece of equipment or taught you how to tie a new fly pattern? Who gave you sound fishing advice or just went out of their way to make you feel welcome at a club event? That is who will be chosen for this award.
And, as our nations president says, go ahead and vote twice. Or three or four times. (Just once for each kind deed though).
You can cast your ballot by emailing me at troutdock89@gmail.com or texting me at (831) 238-3037. We’ll announce the results in the January newsletter.
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Take the 2 question survey

With Covid-19 still upon us, the club is brainstorming ideas for how we can continue to connect our community while respecting social distance recommendations. We’d love to get each of your feedback and invite you to share any ideas you may have as well.

Use this link to go to the survey.

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New Board Member – Camille Padilla

I’m originally from Sitka, Alaska, and grew up in a commercial fishing family spending summers from year 10 to 21 commercially fishing for salmon. I was introduced to fly fishing by my father during a bone fishing trip to Belize in the 90s – talk about a blast!
For the past decade fishing has taken a back seat to school and career, but with my recent move to Santa Cruz I’m picking up the rod again and am excited to shake off the rust and get back into the sport!
I’m coming to the board after clicking a box on the new member form in March raising my hand to help. I believe deeply in giving back and being part of the SC fly fishing organization is a great way to give back, promote a great sport, and continue expand my SC community.

Fun fact:
– I took a sabbatical in 2019 and spent the year traveling the world, did a fair bit of fishing too!

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New newsletter board member: Scott Kitayama

by Newsletter Editor - Scott Kitayama

I grew up on a flower farm in Colorado and spent many days worm-fishing with my family.  The first time I saw someone fly fishing, I didn’t know what it was, I just knew it was magical.   Came to California to attend UC Berkeley in Computer Science and later Dartmouth for an MBA.  Spent a lot of years in Silicon Valley working in software marketing and then at my family’s flower business.  My wife, Eva, and I are now empty-nesters in Watsonville where I do a little consulting, but mainly try to figure out how to catch local fish.  I look forward to fishing with club members and helping the SCFF club where I can.